© 2013 Oscar Cintronmarina
BEER
DUCKS
© 2013 Oscar Cintronmarina
BEER
DUCKS
The Yashica MG-1 is a large rangefinder with a CdS sensor that is ensconced within the face of the outer portion of the lens.  This is very advantageous when using filters because the compensation  is automatically added by the CdS sensor.  The camera, though large, is not that heavy because of the lightweight metals  used  in its construction.  Mind you, it does have  some heft to it unlike the cheap plastic cameras  of the 1990s. The metering system  works with 2 lights: red and amber.  On top of the camera are 2 small circles in the aforementioned colors informing you of overexposure and underexposure that light up,  while depressing the shutter release half- way, respectively so that you can adjust the aperture setting.  When looking through the viewfinder and pressing the shutter release halfway, you’ll see the same colors but in large symbolic arrows.   The amber arrow will point to your left and the red to your right letting you know in what direction to turn the aperture ring.  If you don’t see any arrow within or circle on top light up, then your picture will be properly exposed if your camera is in good order.  Needless to say, this is an aperture priority type camera and there is no manual  option at your disposal; and, the camera depends on a battery for full and proper operation. The battery is the only drawback to this camera.  The original battery is the PX32A and it is very long battery with
considerable girth compared to today’s single batteries.  It measures 1.75 inches  or 55mm in length.  My camera came with the large battery and to this day  it still works.  Interestingly, Duracell was making them in the 6 volts variety when the original voltage had been 5.6 volts. Yet, don’t start biting your fingernails, because the good news is that some enterprising individuals have created adapters which allow the insertion of the current but smaller 6 V batteries.  Either the A544 or the 28A will work.  The A544 are slightly thicker  by a millimeter.  Of the two adapters featured, the one on the left is the best one compared to the the smaller rubber one the on right.  The rubber one makes  it difficult to push the battery in and make contact with the metal screw embedded in the cylindrical wooden piece.  With the adapter on the left, the battery just slides in easily.  Avoid the rubber one at all costs.  However, if you wish to avoid the adapter, you can also buy full size 6 volt batteries.  There’s the Exell A32PX or the PX32.  You can find them easily online.  A quarter comes in handy to unscrew the battery cover underneath the camera.  It’s a little awkward screwing it back on with the battery in place, because the large base spring in the battery compartment forces the battery to protrude a good  ways outside the chamber.
The Yashica MG- 1 comes with a very durable plastic strap.  If you get a good one, they are very reliable.  But some are oily and are constantly leaking some strange, slimy and greasy substance; sometimes a good wipe with your favorite cleaner will solve the problem but if it doesn’t you’ll have to throw it away unless of course you enjoy the feeling of a slimy, slippery  and greasy strap around your neck and on your hands. I immersed two problematic straps into a small plastic container filled with a generic glass cleaner and forgot about’em for about a month or two.  When I took them out recently, one was still black and the other one had turned gray.  After some time had elapsed the gray one recovered its original black color.  So far, so good.  Other straps arrive in a state of rigor mortis and there’s no way to soften them...that I know of.  If you’re fortunate, the camera will come with a plastic cap with the Yashica emblem on the front. Some of the accessories that were available for the Yashica MG-1 were Yashica Flashes CS-14, CS-10, ES-20 and the exclusive auxiliary lens set that came with a viewfinder.  These auxiliary lenses are different from the ones that are used with the Yashica Electro 35s or GSNs.  They have a 5.6 maximum aperture versus a 4.0 maximum aperture and are more difficult to acquire.  These lenses slip-on unlike the others.  The only other lenses similar would be the ones for the Yashica GX which have the same maximum aperture of 5.6; however, they’re the screw-on type.
The Yashica GL, GSN and others used this same battery. Here you can truly see the difference in size.
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YASHICA MG-1 PHOTOGRAPHY
This strap came in "like new" condition. No  rigor mortis or slimy oozings.